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A tropical depression is probably forming off the coast. Here’s what you need to know

Hurricane Dorian moves away from NC coast after Cape Hatteras landfall

Hurricane Dorian made landfall over Cape Hatteras, NC at 8:35 a.m, according to the National Hurricane Center. The storm pounded the coast with heavy rain and wind, causing severe flooding and power outages across the state.
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Hurricane Dorian made landfall over Cape Hatteras, NC at 8:35 a.m, according to the National Hurricane Center. The storm pounded the coast with heavy rain and wind, causing severe flooding and power outages across the state.

Projections earlier in the week showed a possible tropical depression passing by the Carolinas after it developed in Florida — but Saturday reports from the National Hurricane Center show that it’s moving away from the coast.

The band of thunderstorms was over south Florida Saturday, and has a 90 percent chance of forming into a cyclone in the next five days.

While the vast majority of projections have the system moving away from the coast and not posing a threat to the Carolinas, the Weather Channel reported that the storms, along with a looming cold front over the Southeast, could still cause swells, rip currents and coastal flooding in the next week, as well as heavy rain showers.

Rip currents are powerful, narrow channels of fast-moving water that are prevalent along the East, Gulf, and West coasts of the U.S. Moving at speeds of up to eight feet per second, rip currents can move faster than an Olympic swimmer. Lifeguards

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Rachel Jones covers education for the Island Packet and the Beaufort Gazette. She attended the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and has worked for the Daily Tar Heel and Charlotte Observer. Rachel grew up in Ayden, NC, surrounded by teachers.
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