Untamed Lowcountry

Yikes: Here’s why you never want to poke a Lowcountry rattlesnake

Diamondback rattlesnake found on Fripp Island says ‘NOPE’ when camera gets too close

Jessica Miller, naturalist at Fripp Island Resort, relocates certain snakes found on Fripp Island and takes them to Old Island, a wildlife management area near Fripp, where they can slither freely without scaring the heck out of humans. Miller sai
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Jessica Miller, naturalist at Fripp Island Resort, relocates certain snakes found on Fripp Island and takes them to Old Island, a wildlife management area near Fripp, where they can slither freely without scaring the heck out of humans. Miller sai

Diamondback rattlesnakes are one of six species in the Lowcountry that you really don’t want to mess with.

But Jessica Miller, naturalist at Fripp Island Beach Resort, sometimes has to relocate them.

“I take them to Old Island, a wildlife management area,” she said. “Better then them getting killed!”

Miller recently relocated a female diamondback rattlesnake and took an amazing video of the slithering creature.

But when she tried to get a close shot of the snake’s face, it wasn’t having it.

“The rattling and striking was only because I was bothering her so much,” Miller said on Facebook. “She only wanted to be left alone!”

Helpful tips to avoid a surprise encounter with a rattlesnake and what to do if you're bit, from Scott Smith, who teaches about reptiles and amphibians in Idaho. Know when they're active and how they judge danger.

A non-venomous Eastern Kingsnake measuring over 6 ft. in length was spotted by Naturalists of the Kiawah Island Nature Program this week.

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