On Monday, May 5, Bryan Frazier and crew aboard Outcast Sport Fishing, a charter boat owned by Chip Michalove out of Hilton Head Harbor, work to tag a tiger shark in Port Royal Sound. The 11-foot-long, 650-pound female shark was named Miss Michalove, in honor of Michalove's late mother. Michalove is working with the S.C. Department of Natural Resources and the nonprofit organization OCEARCH to tag and track a handful of tiger sharks. The team will tag about 10 sharks to study their behavior.
On Monday, May 5, Bryan Frazier and crew aboard Outcast Sport Fishing, a charter boat owned by Chip Michalove out of Hilton Head Harbor, work to tag a tiger shark in Port Royal Sound. The 11-foot-long, 650-pound female shark was named Miss Michalove, in honor of Michalove's late mother. Michalove is working with the S.C. Department of Natural Resources and the nonprofit organization OCEARCH to tag and track a handful of tiger sharks. The team will tag about 10 sharks to study their behavior. Submitted photo
On Monday, May 5, Bryan Frazier and crew aboard Outcast Sport Fishing, a charter boat owned by Chip Michalove out of Hilton Head Harbor, work to tag a tiger shark in Port Royal Sound. The 11-foot-long, 650-pound female shark was named Miss Michalove, in honor of Michalove's late mother. Michalove is working with the S.C. Department of Natural Resources and the nonprofit organization OCEARCH to tag and track a handful of tiger sharks. The team will tag about 10 sharks to study their behavior. Submitted photo

5 Port Royal Sound tiger sharks 'pinging' on OCEARCH map

June 11, 2014 06:54 PM

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