Gracie Packard, 6, holds up sand dollars she found in the area. Sand dollars are living creatures. Biologists recommend that people return them to the water. However, the creatures’  skeletons, which turn white when exposed to the elements, are fair game as keepsakes. Photo by R.C. Van Essendelft of Beaufort.
Gracie Packard, 6, holds up sand dollars she found in the area. Sand dollars are living creatures. Biologists recommend that people return them to the water. However, the creatures’ skeletons, which turn white when exposed to the elements, are fair game as keepsakes. Photo by R.C. Van Essendelft of Beaufort. Special to the Gazette
Gracie Packard, 6, holds up sand dollars she found in the area. Sand dollars are living creatures. Biologists recommend that people return them to the water. However, the creatures’ skeletons, which turn white when exposed to the elements, are fair game as keepsakes. Photo by R.C. Van Essendelft of Beaufort. Special to the Gazette

Quintessentially Lowcountry: Sand dollars a coveted beach treasure

August 14, 2009 12:00 AM

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