Letters to the Editor

Hilton Head can afford trips to Italy, but not fire hydrants? | Letters

Why a lack of fire hydrants is dangerous for many northern Beaufort County homeowners

Many homes in northern Beaufort County aren't built near fire hydrants. One of those homes was lost to a fire in May — and two dogs died. Here's what happened during that fire— and the impact the lack of hydrants had on fighting the flames.
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Many homes in northern Beaufort County aren't built near fire hydrants. One of those homes was lost to a fire in May — and two dogs died. Here's what happened during that fire— and the impact the lack of hydrants had on fighting the flames.

Let me make sure I have this straight. The Town of Hilton Head Island can afford to send its mayor and town manager and the town manager’s wife to Verona, Italy because “there’s much to be learned from its leaders,” but can’t afford to install fire hydrants to protect its citizens?

Ever heard of email? I’m sure the leaders of Verona would be happy to share their wisdom over that format.

I can’t tell you how glad I am to live in unincorporated Beaufort County.

Susan Dickson

St. Helena Island

What to do about housing shortage for Hilton Head workers

Readers concerned with the lack of and/or overpriced housing of our valued tourism workers need to check out William S. Hettinger’s “Living and Working in Paradise: Why Housing is Too Expensive and What Communities Can Do About It.”

Skip right to pages 102-103 and study the two tables presented: a land-use management regulations and zoning regulations approach, and also the growth-management regulations approach. Both approaches yield negative results and can further degrade potential for affordable housing.

Is it possible Hilton Head Island and its neighborly environs employ a hybrid practice of these approaches? Surely a rhetorical question. And surely a new equilibrium must be studied and implemented.

Using a public-health model, we would initiate a community-based assessment and, based on a meta analysis, would create an intervention. Conveniently, the book’s author describes this for us on page 31.

Simply put, this community must likewise do this or we will be reading more articles like your recent piece on housing shortages and lack of workers.

Meanwhile, read the book.

Jerry A. O’Ryan

Hilton Head Island

The Equalithy Act: It’s equality for all or none

A recent letter claimed that H.R. 5, the Equality Act, was an attack by government on Christian beliefs, that it will have “devastating effects on children, parents, business owners ...” and that it is an attempt by government to tell people what to think and believe.

In fact, nowhere does the bill say that you can’t dislike someone because of his/her gender, sexual orientation or gender identity. You are absolutely free to teach your children to hate these people because of who they are, and free to associate with like-minded people (e.g. your church) to speak in opposition to them and their “lifestyle.”

What you are not free to do is deny anyone access to public services funded with my tax dollars. A business owner or medical professional providing a product or service to the general public may not deny that product or service because of a person’s sexual orientation. If you’re licensed by the government to provide a public service, you have to serve all the public. That’s what the bill says.

The writer invokes the Nazi tactics of demonizing Jews as the first step toward eliminating them, implying that these same tactics are now being used against Christians. It seems to me those facing discrimination are not the Christians, but those the bill is seeking to protect.

Christianity is not the official state religion. We live in a country where we can worship (or not) as we choose without government interference as long as we don’t interfere with the rights of others.

Michael Robinson

Hilton Head Island

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