Hurricane

Power could be out for extended periods in parts of S.C. because of Hurricane Florence

Much of Chester County, and pockets of York and Lancaster counties, could benefit from a $398.5 million U.S. Department of Agriculture investment in rural electric service spanning 13 states.
Much of Chester County, and pockets of York and Lancaster counties, could benefit from a $398.5 million U.S. Department of Agriculture investment in rural electric service spanning 13 states.

The predicted slow movement of Hurricane Florence could delay the start of electrical line repairs.

And that could mean extended power outages in some parts of South Carolina, warns The Electric Cooperatives of South Carolina, the state association for the state’s electric co-ops.

Hurricane Florence could bring tropical storm-force winds of more than 35 mph, making it unsafe for workers to fix the lines because their trucks could wobble and be moved by strong winds, said Van O’Cain, spokesman for the association whose members provide power to 1.3 million South Carolinians.

“If this thing slow-walks across the state, the first consumers to lose power could be off for an extra time period while the storm passes — plus the time it takes to make repairs,” said Reed Cooper, manager of engineering at Horry Electric Cooperative in Conway. “It’s just one more headache for both consumers and utilities.”

Residents are encouraged to double-check their hurricane kit and make sure they have enough flashlights and batteries, and possibly even a generator, to ensure some electricity until repair crews arrive.

Residents can check whether their area is experiencing a power outage with this map.

Follow more of our reporting on Hurricane Florence

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