Beaufort News

Beaufort Mayor Billy Keyserling in Washington to oppose offshore drilling

File: Beaufort Mayor Billy Keyserling, left, discusses the threats that offshore oil and gas development will have on South Carolina's healthy ocean ecosystems, fisheries and tourism, while highlighting the benefits of offshore wind, including its ability to produce more jobs and energy while at the pavilion at Waterfront Park on January 14, 2015.
File: Beaufort Mayor Billy Keyserling, left, discusses the threats that offshore oil and gas development will have on South Carolina's healthy ocean ecosystems, fisheries and tourism, while highlighting the benefits of offshore wind, including its ability to produce more jobs and energy while at the pavilion at Waterfront Park on January 14, 2015. Theophil Syslo

Beaufort Mayor Billy Keyserling was in Washington, D.C., this week to oppose offshore drilling and testing for oil and natural gas in the Atlantic Ocean.



Keyserling was part of a group of coastal municipal leaders in the nation's capital to meet with federal officials ahead of an updated proposal on offshore drilling expected from President Barack Obama's administration early next year.



Keyserling visited Washington on Wednesday and Thursday and met with aides to Congressman Tom Rice and U.S. Interior Secretary Sally Jewell, asking the officials to oppose siesmic testing. The testing uses loud blasts of sound from airguns to gather data about what oil reserves might be under the ocean floor.



"The testing is the first point of contact, the most likely to happen sooner and potentially the most damaging," Keyserling said. "Especially since most people believe there is very little down there off of our coast."



The Department of Interior announced a five-year plan this year to lease federal waters from Virginia to Georgia to companies to drill for oil and gas. The program would operate from 2017 until 2022.



South Carolina's coastal communities -- including Beaufort -- have opposed the plan and drilling's precursor, seismic testing. 



Beaufort is fighitng a S.C. Department of Health and Environmental Control determination that a permit application from Spectrum Geo to begin seismic testing is consistent with the state's Coastal Zone Management Program. The city has asked for a hearing on the decision in S.C. Administrative Law Court.



The final decision on federal siesmic testing permits will be made by the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, which is currently accepting public comment. 



Keyserling said testing and drilling will affect marine life and the area's tourist economy and that the risk is too big for what some believe will be a small amount of oil and gas.

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