Food & Drink

7 tailgating recipes to make the opening of college football delicious — even if you lose

Hungry for a championship, Tigers fans cook up a tailgate spread

Scenes from the parking lot at Raymond James Stadium in Tampa include diehard fans grilling up quite the spread -- including Clemson sauce sliders.
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Scenes from the parking lot at Raymond James Stadium in Tampa include diehard fans grilling up quite the spread -- including Clemson sauce sliders.

Get ready for college football you Gamecocks, Clemson, and Tar Heels fans — or haters.

This upcoming weekend opens the season, which means it’s time to pull out your school colors and root for your favorite team.

And while the game itself is arguably one of the best parts of college football, tailgating with friends and family is almost as high on the list.

Nobody celebrates football quite like the South, and we never disappoint when it comes to its tailgating.

1. Boiled Peanuts

Some people aren’t a fan of the slimy snack, but it’s still a Lowcountry staple that’s easy to make and pass out to a crowd.

It might take a minute to get used to the texture and taste, but at least it’s better than some boring ol’ dry peanuts, right?

Boiled peanuts are a Lowcountry classic. But they're an acquired taste. We asked a few Island Packet-Beaufort Gazette staff members to give them a try, and, well, they're not for everyone.

2. Southern-style Deviled Eggs

You can’t have a tailgating party without this devilish dish.

You can easily just boil an egg, add some mayo and tartar sauce and call it good.

Or you can do everyone a favor and follow this Southern Living recipe to add a Southern twist to the ordinary deviled eggs.

3. Lowcountry Boil

If everybody, from your Nana to your Clemson-fanatic neighbor, is coming to your tailgate, you’ll need a large, easy-to-make dish.

That’s where a good Lowcountry Boil, a.k.a. Frogmore stew, comes in.

The Lowcountry dish is based on the fact that all you need is a big boiling pot, enough seafood, sausages and corn to throw into it and you’ll have yourself a feast for days.

4. Chocolate marble sheet cake

#chocolatemarblecake

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If you’re not going to use caffeine to put a pep in your step, you might as well devour some sugary goodness.

Try this chocolate marble sheet cake recipe to make even the lousiest defeat a little bit sweeter.

5. All the casserole & cobbler-you-can-eat

A good cheese and broccoli, chicken or pork casserole adds plenty of flavor to your tailgating menu.

And let’s be honest, for those of us who are culinary-challenged, casseroles are one of the easiest dishes to make without too much effort.

You can make your team the perfect breakfast casserole for that 11 a.m. kick-off.

Or just forget the calories and have yourself a peach-pecan cobbler or upside-down cake — any fruit will do.

Southern Living’s upside down caramelized apple cake recipe is one recipe you have to try.

6. Warm turnip green dip

You got to have something to go with those tortilla chips, celery, and crackers, but don’t settle for boring old salsa, guac or cheese.

Make this spicy Southern dip that includes bits of bacon and red pepper with a bit of dry white wine.

7. Good ol’ BBQ

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Last, but certainly not least, you can’t have a Southern tailgate without some good old Southern barbecue.

Hot dogs are probably the easiest to put on the grill, but every Southerner knows the true heart of barbecue comes from its ribs.

Whether it’s baby back or spareribs, you have to chow down on some ribs before you head into the stadium or sit in the comfort of the parking lot.

Ted Huffman, owner and pitmaster at Bluffton BBQ at Calhoun Street Promenade, shares, on Wednesday, May 25, 2016, the secret to making succulent, juicy and tender Boston butt for pulled pork and gives some tips on how do just that.

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