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Slowly but surely we’re making progress on our bus

We needed to paint the metal floor to prevent future rusting. Since we’ve always wondered how teal walls would look in the bus, we decided to try the color (Tsunami by Behr) on a layer of the floor that will be hidden under insulation and subfloor.
We needed to paint the metal floor to prevent future rusting. Since we’ve always wondered how teal walls would look in the bus, we decided to try the color (Tsunami by Behr) on a layer of the floor that will be hidden under insulation and subfloor. Submitted

The excitement of finally getting to the fun part with the bus is nipping at our feet. For the first time in a long time we’re starting to see progress and my wife, Jenn, and I are excited to be one step closer to our skoolie dream.

Before we can move into the bus, we need to get the floor installed. And before we install the floors, we have to prep the base layer.

Step one: Fill holes

We must first fill in the 88 holes left behind when we removed all 22 bus seats. We tried three methods to fill these holes.

First we tested JB Weld Steel Stick. This is a gray putty that you mix together and place over the hole. We tried just the putty on one hole and attached the putty to the back of a penny on another hole. It didn’t solidify as much as we hoped by itself, but on the back of a penny it worked pretty well.

Although using a penny worked well, it was time consuming. It takes us about an hour and a half to get out to the bus site, so we usually don’t have a lot of time to spare. We needed to find a faster method.

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Pennies and marine adhesive sealant were a winning combination to fill in the holes in the bus floor. Steve Dassatti Submitted

So we tried a combination of pennies and marine adhesive sealant. We poured out our penny jar, added a coat of sealant to the coins, and placed them over the holes. Eighty-eight cents later, each hole was sealed. Now that’s making your money work for you.

Step two: Add paint

We needed to paint the metal floor to prevent future rusting. We’ve been planning on painting the bus walls teal but aren’t sure how it would look or what shade would work best — Gypsy Teal? Blue Peacock? Oceanside? So we decided to try the color (we went with Tsunami by Behr) on a layer of the floor that won’t be seen by anyone (it’ll be under a layer of insulation, subfloor, and wide plank flooring).

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We’re obsessed with teal walls but unsure how the color will look in the bus. So we tried the color Tsunami by Behr on a layer of floor that we’ll cover with insulation and subfloor. We’re in love! behr.com

We bought a gallon and painted our little hearts out. Within moments the floor had its first coat of paint and, to quote Billy Crystal, it looked marvelous!

Actually being able to see a result also helped us feel accomplished. Sometimes it’s hard to really see all the progress we’ve made, so painting was a big win for us.

And like everything with the bus, two steps forward, one step back.

Shortly after we painted the floor, I got a good size cold and work stopped. As soon as I am back to feeling like myself, the bus will be priority No. 1 again.

I hear the same type of things happen to those with houses. Projects take longer than expected, you start a minor home repair only to find the work is more serious than you thought and you’re in over your head. It doesn’t seem to matter how big your living space is, they are all more alike than we think.

Next time on Redefining The American Dream: How important is a floor? How much teal is too much teal? Riiight, we have to Thanksgiving in this ...” Answers to these things and more. Same bus time, same bus article.

Steve Dassatti is a husband, father, film school graduate and now bus renovator. Despite his best efforts he has not lost his mind, or an appendage, yet. Follow his journey on Instagram @Thosemodernhippies.

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