RBC Heritage

Sportsmanship (and Tiger's lack) a topic at Christian Heritage Breakfast

PGA Tour golfer Charles Warren takes time out from practicing Tuesday to help Isabelle Taylor, 5, of Hilton Head Island learn to putt, while her friend Bailey Headlee, 10, looks on during the Verizon Heritage’s Coca-Cola Youth Day event at Harbour Town Golf Links.
PGA Tour golfer Charles Warren takes time out from practicing Tuesday to help Isabelle Taylor, 5, of Hilton Head Island learn to putt, while her friend Bailey Headlee, 10, looks on during the Verizon Heritage’s Coca-Cola Youth Day event at Harbour Town Golf Links. JAY KARR | The Island Packet

It was only a matter of time before Tiger Woods' temperament came up at the 14th annual Christian Heritage Breakfast on Tuesday morning.

"We watched this past weekend -- guys hit shots and they blurt out obscenities and profanities," said Jose Alvarez, the event's moderator and a chaplain on the PGA Tour's minor-league circuit, the Nationwide Tour. He was referring to Woods' appearance at the Masters last week, during which cameras caught him cursing after several errant drives.

Alvarez then turned to two-time U.S. Open winner Lee Janzen and asked how he coped with poor play in the middle of a round.

"How do you handle the bad shots?" he asked. "I've never seen you out slinging clubs and screaming and cussing."

"You just haven't watched me enough," Janzen said with a smile.

Janzen, who this week will make his 19th appearance at the Verizon Heritage in the past 20 years, was the featured speaker at Tuesday's event, hosted by the Presbyterian Men of the Church. The 32-year-old organization is part of Hilton Head Island's First Presbyterian and Providence Presbyterian churches.

Janzen said religion played a minimal role in his life when he took up the game, but he began to more seriously ponder his faith after the birth of his son 17 years ago.

"I just started wondering, 'Okay, I'm going to church. I'm trying to lead a good life. How am I really going to know if I'm going to get to heaven?' " Janzen said. "How good do you have to be?

"Finally I was given the answer: 'You don't have to worry about how good your life is because it'll never be good enough.' It was such an eye-opening, relieving, enlightening experience to know that I didn't have to try to live a standard of goodness where I had to beat myself up every time I made a mistake."

One goal of the breakfast is to inspire young athletes, according to Mike Brock, the event's chairman. Several golf teams from area schools, a former golf professional and many church members attended.

Janzen stressed the need for athletes to balance sports and religion.

"It's easy to make golf, or any sport, your god," he said. "Very few (players) ever make it to the top, and even if they did make it all the way to No. 1 in the world, in golf it's only for a short time. Eventually you're going to look back in your life and wonder what it's all about."

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