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Aerial images show Hurricane Dorian’s impact on the coast from Florida to Virginia

Aerial views of Hurricane Dorian aftermath on Ocracoke Island

Aerial footage shows flooding and wind damage on Ocracoke Island and washed out and sand covered sections of N.C. 12 in the Outer Banks.
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Aerial footage shows flooding and wind damage on Ocracoke Island and washed out and sand covered sections of N.C. 12 in the Outer Banks.

A new map shows the coast from Miami to Newport News, Virginia, with detailed aerial images displaying the damage from Hurricane Dorian.

The images, released on an interactive Google map from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, stitches together aerial imagery to give a close-up view of the damage from Dorian’s slow crawl up the East Coast.

Cape Lookout National Seashore in North Carolina posted the map on its Facebook page, encouraging members to check out the damage on Portsmouth Island.

“How many new cuts and/or new inlets do you count on the island?” the post said.

There are several, according to the images. They also show the flooding and storm damage along Ocracoke Island and sand pushed up along N.C. Highway 12 on Hatteras Island.

There are about 54 new inlets “cutting through from the Atlantic Ocean to the Core Sound at various points of North Core Banks,” Cape Lookout National Seashore said in a press release Monday. “There are major damages to 38 historic structures at Portsmouth Village, including flooding, and wind-related destruction.”

The images will be used “to support NOAA homeland security and emergency response requirements,” the administration said. “In addition, it will be used for ongoing research efforts for testing and developing standards for airborne digital imagery. Individual images have been combined into a larger mosaic and tiled for distribution.”

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Charles Duncan covers what’s happening right now across North and South Carolina, from breaking news to fun or interesting stories from across the region. He holds degrees from N.C. State University and Duke and lives two blocks from the ocean in Myrtle Beach.
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