Hunley conservators examine the Confederate submarine H.L. Hunley after it was lifted three feet inside its tank Wednesday in Charleston. The lifting is the first step in a process to rotate the sub into an upright position. It was the first time the sub has moved in nearly 11 years. When the sub was recovered, it was a sealed time capsule, filled with sand, sediment and artifacts. Since then, scientists have removed several pieces of the sub and completely excavated its interior, recovering the crew and 2,000 artifacts.
Hunley conservators examine the Confederate submarine H.L. Hunley after it was lifted three feet inside its tank Wednesday in Charleston. The lifting is the first step in a process to rotate the sub into an upright position. It was the first time the sub has moved in nearly 11 years. When the sub was recovered, it was a sealed time capsule, filled with sand, sediment and artifacts. Since then, scientists have removed several pieces of the sub and completely excavated its interior, recovering the crew and 2,000 artifacts. Grace Beahm, postandcourier.com
Hunley conservators examine the Confederate submarine H.L. Hunley after it was lifted three feet inside its tank Wednesday in Charleston. The lifting is the first step in a process to rotate the sub into an upright position. It was the first time the sub has moved in nearly 11 years. When the sub was recovered, it was a sealed time capsule, filled with sand, sediment and artifacts. Since then, scientists have removed several pieces of the sub and completely excavated its interior, recovering the crew and 2,000 artifacts. Grace Beahm, postandcourier.com