Beaufort News

Car lovers showcase their rides at Concours

Ray Piechocki of Savannah stands next to his 1923 Ford T-bucket Saturday afternoon during the 2010 Car Club Jamboree at the Hilton Head Island Annual Concours d'Elegance and Motoring Festival at Honey Horn.
Ray Piechocki of Savannah stands next to his 1923 Ford T-bucket Saturday afternoon during the 2010 Car Club Jamboree at the Hilton Head Island Annual Concours d'Elegance and Motoring Festival at Honey Horn. Sarah Welliver

While many car shows feature performance vehicles and roadsters, it's not often that a vintage milk truck is part of the mix.

But that's just what Shane Cagle of Haw River, N.C., was showcasing Saturday at the Hilton Head Island Concours d'Elegance and Motoring Festival's newest exhibit -- "Life on the Farm."

The popular display showcased vehicles that shaped American agriculture. It included antique tractors with hand cranks and Ford Model T produce trucks from the 1920s filled Saturday, as it was way back when, with hay and winter squashes.

For Cagle, the green-and-white 1954 Divco 11 milk truck was a labor of both love and memory. Cagle said he remembered milk in glass bottles being delivered to his home.

"I don't even like milk," he said. "I just like the trucks."

Drivers have to stand to operate the Divco truck. Its speed tops out at 35 mph.

A few feet away, at the Road to the Future exhibit, the speeds were considerably faster. That exhibit featured the latest in vehicle technology. The exhibit offered, among other vehicles, a Tesla electric car, hybrids from Porsche and BMW and -- shown for the first time in the southeastern United States -- the Hyundai Equus.

Both exhibits are components of the festival's theme of past, present and future.

Saturday's big draw was the Car Club Jamboree, where 18 different clubs paraded 175 different cars, according to director of sponsorship Ted Allenbach. Featured were car clubs that focused on Italian models such as Lamborghini, Ferrari, Fiat and Alfa Romeo.

"Many of these cars are daily drivers while some are real collector cars," he said.

The honored marque for this year's festival is the Chevrolet brand.

Each of the festival's four events -- the speed classic last weekend, this weekend's displays and today's official competition -- highlight models from the early 1900s to the most recent sports cars.

Somewhere in the middle is Dennis Findley of Rock Hill, S.C. His blue, 1965 Corvair Monza convertible, which he drove more than three hours to be a part of the show, won him a Committee's Chair award for automotive excellence.

"The color is attractive to a lot of people and we try to keep it as pristine as we can even though we drive it," he said.

Today marks the official Concours d'Elegance competition. Over 150 vintage cars and motorcycles will compete for Best of Show and People's Choice awards. All cars must have been manufactured in 1972 or earlier while motorcycles must date from 1980 and earlier.

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