A bulldozer from the South Carolina Forestry Division trundles through the Whooping Crane Pond Conservancy in Hilton Head Plantation after being called out Tuesday to help the Town of Hilton Head Island Fire & Rescue Division fight a brush fire. The bulldozer's plow was used to build a fire break around the burned area to prevent any remnants of the fire from spreading. Because of dry conditions, the burned area could smolder for weeks, said bulldozer driver David Hart. The Fire & Rescue Division responded to the blaze at about 3:11 p.m., according to division spokeswoman Joheida Fister. It spread over about an acre and was contained by about 5 p.m. Five fire engines, a truck company and a vehicle that hauls water battled the blaze, she said. Whooping Crane Way was closed to residents other than those living in neighborhoods near the front gate while crews fought the fire. The road was reopened to all traffic by about 6 p.m. No injuries were reported, and no homes were threatened, she said. Fire officials have not determined what caused the fire. Investigators will examine the area Wednesday to try and determine where and how the blaze began, Fister said. Fister warned residents take care when burning debris or cooking outdoors because of recent dry conditions. The conservation area spans 127 acres and is home to a variety of birds, including ospreys, owls and hawks.
A bulldozer from the South Carolina Forestry Division trundles through the Whooping Crane Pond Conservancy in Hilton Head Plantation after being called out Tuesday to help the Town of Hilton Head Island Fire & Rescue Division fight a brush fire. The bulldozer's plow was used to build a fire break around the burned area to prevent any remnants of the fire from spreading. Because of dry conditions, the burned area could smolder for weeks, said bulldozer driver David Hart. The Fire & Rescue Division responded to the blaze at about 3:11 p.m., according to division spokeswoman Joheida Fister. It spread over about an acre and was contained by about 5 p.m. Five fire engines, a truck company and a vehicle that hauls water battled the blaze, she said. Whooping Crane Way was closed to residents other than those living in neighborhoods near the front gate while crews fought the fire. The road was reopened to all traffic by about 6 p.m. No injuries were reported, and no homes were threatened, she said. Fire officials have not determined what caused the fire. Investigators will examine the area Wednesday to try and determine where and how the blaze began, Fister said. Fister warned residents take care when burning debris or cooking outdoors because of recent dry conditions. The conservation area spans 127 acres and is home to a variety of birds, including ospreys, owls and hawks. Jay Karr/ The Island Packet
A bulldozer from the South Carolina Forestry Division trundles through the Whooping Crane Pond Conservancy in Hilton Head Plantation after being called out Tuesday to help the Town of Hilton Head Island Fire & Rescue Division fight a brush fire. The bulldozer's plow was used to build a fire break around the burned area to prevent any remnants of the fire from spreading. Because of dry conditions, the burned area could smolder for weeks, said bulldozer driver David Hart. The Fire & Rescue Division responded to the blaze at about 3:11 p.m., according to division spokeswoman Joheida Fister. It spread over about an acre and was contained by about 5 p.m. Five fire engines, a truck company and a vehicle that hauls water battled the blaze, she said. Whooping Crane Way was closed to residents other than those living in neighborhoods near the front gate while crews fought the fire. The road was reopened to all traffic by about 6 p.m. No injuries were reported, and no homes were threatened, she said. Fire officials have not determined what caused the fire. Investigators will examine the area Wednesday to try and determine where and how the blaze began, Fister said. Fister warned residents take care when burning debris or cooking outdoors because of recent dry conditions. The conservation area spans 127 acres and is home to a variety of birds, including ospreys, owls and hawks. Jay Karr/ The Island Packet