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Brett Westerfield holds up a rope and lets a group of children hunt for Easter eggs during the Tri-Command Easter Egg Hunt at Freedom Sound Park in Laurel Bay Saturday morning.  Westerfield has been the coordinator of the  Single Marine and Sailor Program since its inception in Beaufort over eight years ago.
Brett Westerfield holds up a rope and lets a group of children hunt for Easter eggs during the Tri-Command Easter Egg Hunt at Freedom Sound Park in Laurel Bay Saturday morning. Westerfield has been the coordinator of the Single Marine and Sailor Program since its inception in Beaufort over eight years ago.

Brett Westerfield considers it his job to keep Beaufort's unwed Marines and sailors entertained and out of trouble.

Whether arranging bus trips to Savannah and Charleston, bringing local bands to base hangouts, or coordinating volunteer activities, Westerfield -- a married, 32-year-old Beaufort native -- stays busy as the coordinator of the Tri-Command's Single Marine and Sailor Program.

Established at every major Marine Corps installation, the program focuses on improving the lives of single Marines and sailors through community involvement and recreation.

For Westerfield, the only coordinator Beaufort's Single Marine and Sailor Program has ever known, that means a job that's part cruise director and part advocate.

"We're concerned about their quality of life while they're stationed in Beaufort," he said. "They tell me if the lights are out in the barracks, or if the washer and dryer doesn't work. Fifty percent of our Marines in Beaufort are single. That's what we're dealing with here."

When not lodging complaints about faulty appliances, Westerfield is busy coordinating activities and volunteer opportunities for the nearly 3,000 to 4,000 Beaufort Marines involved in the program.

"I try to bring as much entertainment to them as possible," he said. "We'd rather have them drinking on-base, so they're not out in town causing trouble. It's easier for the community and easier for us. If something happens, the Marine command can handle it, but if it's out in town, you also have the police to deal with on top of the military punishment."

Westerfield's work does not go unnoticed.

"He does a great job," said Sgt. Rashawn Dawson, a Parris Island Marine who has been involved with the program for the past two years. "He does everything from making sure that we have the best equipment in our recreational facilities to setting up some of the best trips and volunteer opportunities you could hope for. I went snowboarding in West Virginia, I never thought I'd have a chance to do something like that."

Dawson said the program provides him and fellow Marines with a chance to give back to the community and blow off some steam.

"It really is nice sometimes to get away from the daily grind," he said.

Events include weekly karaoke night at the No Rockers Down Lounge at Marine Corps Air Station Beaufort and trips to Disney World, Las Vegas and Darlington Speedway for a NASCAR event later this year.

However, Westerfield said his job isn't all about ferrying Marines and sailors from event to activity.

"We want to give back to this community and set up volunteer opportunities for these Marines off-base and on-base as well," he said, citing the group's work with LowCountry Habitat for Humanity and Toys for Tots.

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