Business

THAT'S MY JOB: Bluffton butcher offers a fresh slice of life

Adam Simoneaux, owner operato of Scotts Market in Bluffton, prepares to make special, made-to-order cuts at his butcher shop on June 25, 2015.
Adam Simoneaux, owner operato of Scotts Market in Bluffton, prepares to make special, made-to-order cuts at his butcher shop on June 25, 2015. Carolyn Rennix

This is the third in a series of stories on unpleasant but necessary jobs and the people who do them.

Blood soaked his white apron and bits of red matter sat underneath Adam Simoneaux's fingernails as he carried tens of pounds of beef from the large freezer to prepare special, made-to-order cuts.

After helping nearly 200 customers and spending 10 hours cutting meat, making sausage and grinding ground beef in the cool, brightly lit kitchen, Simoneaux's legs are tired.

Simoneaux, 44, works as the head meat cutter and is the owner of Scotts Market in Bluffton.

He started there when he was 8, so he's long past the time when the sight of raw meat bothered him.

It's his dirty laundry that makes him queasy.

"At the end of the day, my clothes are completely covered in blood," he said. "That has to be the messiest part of the job."

At times it can be dangerous -- as evidenced by two small white scars, one on each hand.

Simoneaux got the first one when he was 9. He sliced his knuckle while cutting -- not meat -- but cabbage.

The second came when he was an adult and made the mistake of trying to catch a large knife as it fell off the counter. That got him eight stitches to his left thumb.

Still, Simoneaux wears a smile as often as he does an apron and greets customers like close friends.

"The best part of my job are the people," he said. "I have always been a people person, and I get to speak with about 200 a day."

Along with their names, he knows most of their orders before they ask.

Simoneaux is the third generation of his family to own the market. The first was his grandfather George H. Scott in 1970. The second was his uncle Jeff Scott in 2004.

While he likes the work, being a butcher was not part of Simoneaux's life plan.

"I wanted to do anything but cut meat," he said. "My grandfather is upstairs laughing at me right now because I spent five years at college (only to end up cutting meat.")

Not that there haven't been some tough times.

His uncle was diagnosed with colon cancer in December 2011. While he beat the odds and survived, he decided to close the market.

Simoneaux reopened it in May 2012.

"I couldn't drive by the store with my family's name out front and see the windows all covered with paper and not do anything," he said.

  Comments