Entertainment

Main Street Youth Theatre takes new path with "Into the Woods"

"Into the Woods," presented by Main Street Youth Theatre: 7 p.m. Oct. 21-22 and 2 p.m. Oct. 23, Hilton Head Island High School's Visual and Performing Arts Center, 70 Wilborn Road, Hilton Head Island. $14; $6 for students. 843-689-6246. www.msyt.org
"Into the Woods," presented by Main Street Youth Theatre: 7 p.m. Oct. 21-22 and 2 p.m. Oct. 23, Hilton Head Island High School's Visual and Performing Arts Center, 70 Wilborn Road, Hilton Head Island. $14; $6 for students. 843-689-6246. www.msyt.org Sarah Welliver/Lowcountry Current

If you're expecting Main Street Youth Theatre's latest production, "Into the Woods," to be a typical kid's play about favorite childhood fairy tales, you're out of luck.

For its 14th season opener, the theater group is broadening its horizons and taking a more adult route with a show that combines Grimm Brothers fairy tales with a comedy featuring adult themes and dark humor.

"The show is really not appropriate for children under 10 years old," said Erika Pyle, operations manager for the group.

Pyle said the youth theater does not strictly stick to children's theater. "Our aim is to provide quality theater and an educational environment to children," she said. However, actors range from ages 5 to 90. For this particular show, five actors are between the ages of 8 and 12. The 15 others are adults.

"We're hoping people will see that we're not just a kid's theater," Pyle said. "It's not like a Winnie the Pooh storytelling type of thing."

The original production of "Into the Woods" premiered on Broadway in 1987. It won several Tony Awards including Best Score and Best Book. Main characters in the story come from the fairy tales "Rapunzel," "Jack and the Bean Stalk," "Little Red Riding Hood" and "Cinderella."

The first act focuses on what happens after "Happily Ever After," Pyle said. "Princes aren't always charming after marriage."

The second act looks at how to deal with the consequences of actions.

The set for the show will not be a normal fairy tale setting, either, Pyle said. Conceptualized by a set designer from New York, the set will be very modern. Hanging from the ceiling will be 1,300 hardback books, all of which were donated by the community.

"It's overwhelming, but so cool," Pyle said.

The costumes also will feature a 1964 haute couture look, instead of princess dresses and knight's armor. All of the costumes were designed by Caroline Noble, owner of Madhouse Vintage in Bluffton.

"Actors, every time they see a new costume, they're like, 'Can we buy that?'" Pyle said.

  Comments