The S.C. Department of Natural Resources plans to allow people to hunt the double-crested cormorant, top photo, on a trial basis at lakes Marion and Moultrie.  The double-crested cormorant can be identified by its hook-tipped beak, unlike the anhinga, bottom photo, which has a straight beak.  The anhinga is sometimes mistaken for the double-crested cormorant due to its size and behavior.
The S.C. Department of Natural Resources plans to allow people to hunt the double-crested cormorant, top photo, on a trial basis at lakes Marion and Moultrie. The double-crested cormorant can be identified by its hook-tipped beak, unlike the anhinga, bottom photo, which has a straight beak. The anhinga is sometimes mistaken for the double-crested cormorant due to its size and behavior. Staff photo
The S.C. Department of Natural Resources plans to allow people to hunt the double-crested cormorant, top photo, on a trial basis at lakes Marion and Moultrie. The double-crested cormorant can be identified by its hook-tipped beak, unlike the anhinga, bottom photo, which has a straight beak. The anhinga is sometimes mistaken for the double-crested cormorant due to its size and behavior. Staff photo

Cormorants a nuisance -- but not yet legal target -- in Beaufort County

October 30, 2013 6:47 PM

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If it swims, flies, creeps or grows in the Lowcountry, you can find it in Untamed Lowcountry.