Excavators, lead by Jim Spirek with the Maritime Research Division at USC, work to extract a canoe from the marsh on Turtle Island which is located just south of Daufuskie Island. The canoe, estimated to be from the 1700s, was discovered by Daufuskie Island resident John Hill and others as they were paddleboarding in the area.
Excavators, lead by Jim Spirek with the Maritime Research Division at USC, work to extract a canoe from the marsh on Turtle Island which is located just south of Daufuskie Island. The canoe, estimated to be from the 1700s, was discovered by Daufuskie Island resident John Hill and others as they were paddleboarding in the area. SCIAA, University of South Carolina
Excavators, lead by Jim Spirek with the Maritime Research Division at USC, work to extract a canoe from the marsh on Turtle Island which is located just south of Daufuskie Island. The canoe, estimated to be from the 1700s, was discovered by Daufuskie Island resident John Hill and others as they were paddleboarding in the area. SCIAA, University of South Carolina

Centuries-old canoe unearthed in sand near Daufuskie Island

October 10, 2012 07:54 PM

UPDATED October 10, 2012 08:12 PM

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