Steven Kessel, a researcher from Cardiff University in Wales, holds a lemon shark as captain Chip Michalove of Outcast Sport Fishing Charters on Hilton Head lends a hand. Kessel and his assistant draw blood, cut a piece of fin for DNA, inject a chip beneath it's skin and make an incision to insert an acoustic transmitter tag before letting the shark swim away.
Steven Kessel, a researcher from Cardiff University in Wales, holds a lemon shark as captain Chip Michalove of Outcast Sport Fishing Charters on Hilton Head lends a hand. Kessel and his assistant draw blood, cut a piece of fin for DNA, inject a chip beneath it's skin and make an incision to insert an acoustic transmitter tag before letting the shark swim away. Photo by Ornella Weideli
Steven Kessel, a researcher from Cardiff University in Wales, holds a lemon shark as captain Chip Michalove of Outcast Sport Fishing Charters on Hilton Head lends a hand. Kessel and his assistant draw blood, cut a piece of fin for DNA, inject a chip beneath it's skin and make an incision to insert an acoustic transmitter tag before letting the shark swim away. Photo by Ornella Weideli

Tagging off Hilton Head could help unlock lemon shark mysteries

August 20, 2011 06:23 PM

UPDATED August 20, 2011 11:24 PM

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