Scott DeArmey, of Bartlett Tree Experts, saws away at one of the hackberry trees that are being cut down because they were growing too close to the tabby ruins at Haig Point on Daufuskie Island on Wednesday. The tabby structures are the remains of slave houses built in the early 1800s, and were in danger of collapse because the roots of the trees were displacing them.
Scott DeArmey, of Bartlett Tree Experts, saws away at one of the hackberry trees that are being cut down because they were growing too close to the tabby ruins at Haig Point on Daufuskie Island on Wednesday. The tabby structures are the remains of slave houses built in the early 1800s, and were in danger of collapse because the roots of the trees were displacing them. Jay Karr/ The Island Packet
Scott DeArmey, of Bartlett Tree Experts, saws away at one of the hackberry trees that are being cut down because they were growing too close to the tabby ruins at Haig Point on Daufuskie Island on Wednesday. The tabby structures are the remains of slave houses built in the early 1800s, and were in danger of collapse because the roots of the trees were displacing them. Jay Karr/ The Island Packet

Problem rooted out! Rare tabby ruins saved from tree roots on Daufuskie Island

May 04, 2011 08:07 PM