After learning about gravity, inertia and friction during a week-long science and math camp at Starbase Marine Corps Air Station Beaufort, these fifth-graders from Mossy Oaks Elementary School applied all that physics to launch their solid-fuel rockets Thursday at the air station. The rockets, made of a cardboard tube with a plastic nose and fins, floated back to Earth by parachute.
After learning about gravity, inertia and friction during a week-long science and math camp at Starbase Marine Corps Air Station Beaufort, these fifth-graders from Mossy Oaks Elementary School applied all that physics to launch their solid-fuel rockets Thursday at the air station. The rockets, made of a cardboard tube with a plastic nose and fins, floated back to Earth by parachute. BOB SOFALY | The Beaufort Gazett
After learning about gravity, inertia and friction during a week-long science and math camp at Starbase Marine Corps Air Station Beaufort, these fifth-graders from Mossy Oaks Elementary School applied all that physics to launch their solid-fuel rockets Thursday at the air station. The rockets, made of a cardboard tube with a plastic nose and fins, floated back to Earth by parachute. BOB SOFALY | The Beaufort Gazett

Blast off!

October 14, 2010 07:51 PM

UPDATED October 14, 2010 07:55 PM

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