Jack Mayes of the Beaufort Sons of the Confederacy cleans brush away from the front of a tombstone inside the Altamaha Old Town Heritage Preserve on Saturday morning. The former Grace Episcopal cemetery was the site of the cleanup.  The cemetery, near Okatie, holds the remains of at least three Confederate veterans and several notable South Carolinians. Several camps of the Sons of Confederate Veterans are working to identify and preserve the graves of Confederate veterans and their cemeteries across the state.
Jack Mayes of the Beaufort Sons of the Confederacy cleans brush away from the front of a tombstone inside the Altamaha Old Town Heritage Preserve on Saturday morning. The former Grace Episcopal cemetery was the site of the cleanup. The cemetery, near Okatie, holds the remains of at least three Confederate veterans and several notable South Carolinians. Several camps of the Sons of Confederate Veterans are working to identify and preserve the graves of Confederate veterans and their cemeteries across the state. Jonathan Dyer/The Beaufort Gazette
Jack Mayes of the Beaufort Sons of the Confederacy cleans brush away from the front of a tombstone inside the Altamaha Old Town Heritage Preserve on Saturday morning. The former Grace Episcopal cemetery was the site of the cleanup. The cemetery, near Okatie, holds the remains of at least three Confederate veterans and several notable South Carolinians. Several camps of the Sons of Confederate Veterans are working to identify and preserve the graves of Confederate veterans and their cemeteries across the state. Jonathan Dyer/The Beaufort Gazette

Volunteers honor Confederate dead

October 16, 2010 08:37 PM

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