H. Boyce Budd, center, a gold medalist in the 1964 Summer Olympics in Tokyo, explains to Capt. Valerie Gaskin and Raymond Szpara  what climbing onto a tossing ship with real cargo netting was like after he enlisted in the U.S. Marine Corps in 1963. Budd, 71, revisited Marine Corps Recruit Depot Parris Island to see how training has changed since he was a recruit more than 40 years ago.
H. Boyce Budd, center, a gold medalist in the 1964 Summer Olympics in Tokyo, explains to Capt. Valerie Gaskin and Raymond Szpara what climbing onto a tossing ship with real cargo netting was like after he enlisted in the U.S. Marine Corps in 1963. Budd, 71, revisited Marine Corps Recruit Depot Parris Island to see how training has changed since he was a recruit more than 40 years ago. BOB SOFALY | The Beaufort Gazette
H. Boyce Budd, center, a gold medalist in the 1964 Summer Olympics in Tokyo, explains to Capt. Valerie Gaskin and Raymond Szpara what climbing onto a tossing ship with real cargo netting was like after he enlisted in the U.S. Marine Corps in 1963. Budd, 71, revisited Marine Corps Recruit Depot Parris Island to see how training has changed since he was a recruit more than 40 years ago. BOB SOFALY | The Beaufort Gazette

Once a Marine, always a Marine -- same with Olympic gold medalist, man finds

February 25, 2010 12:00 AM

UPDATED February 25, 2010 06:35 PM

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