In this February 2017 photo provided by Lynn Tompkins, executive director of the Blue Mountain Wildlife Center, a bald eagle suffers from lead poisoning at the Blue Mountain Wildlife Center in Pendleton, Ore. Eagles consume lead from bullets and shotgun shells while feeding on discarded carcasses left by hunters. Bits of lead bullets consumed along with the meat break down quickly in an eagle's stomach and enter its bloodstream.
In this February 2017 photo provided by Lynn Tompkins, executive director of the Blue Mountain Wildlife Center, a bald eagle suffers from lead poisoning at the Blue Mountain Wildlife Center in Pendleton, Ore. Eagles consume lead from bullets and shotgun shells while feeding on discarded carcasses left by hunters. Bits of lead bullets consumed along with the meat break down quickly in an eagle's stomach and enter its bloodstream. Lynn Tompkins via AP)
In this February 2017 photo provided by Lynn Tompkins, executive director of the Blue Mountain Wildlife Center, a bald eagle suffers from lead poisoning at the Blue Mountain Wildlife Center in Pendleton, Ore. Eagles consume lead from bullets and shotgun shells while feeding on discarded carcasses left by hunters. Bits of lead bullets consumed along with the meat break down quickly in an eagle's stomach and enter its bloodstream. Lynn Tompkins via AP)

Health Care

July 16, 2017 12:21 PM

Bald eagle threat: Lead ammo left behind by hunters

  Comments  

Videos