U.S. reinforcements wade through the surf from a landing craft in the days following D-Day and the Allied invasion of Nazi-occupied France at Normandy in June 1944 during World War II. From the first sketchy German radio broadcast to the distribution of images filmed in color, it has taken decades for the full story of the D-Day invasion to come out. As world leaders and veterans prepare to mark the 70th anniversary of the invasion this week, multiple Twitter hashtags are following the ceremonies minute by minute. At the time, the reporting, filming and taking of photos was neither easy nor straightforward. Photographs by Robert Capa who was embedded with U.S. troops on Omaha Beach, took more than an week for his images to reach American news.
U.S. reinforcements wade through the surf from a landing craft in the days following D-Day and the Allied invasion of Nazi-occupied France at Normandy in June 1944 during World War II. From the first sketchy German radio broadcast to the distribution of images filmed in color, it has taken decades for the full story of the D-Day invasion to come out. As world leaders and veterans prepare to mark the 70th anniversary of the invasion this week, multiple Twitter hashtags are following the ceremonies minute by minute. At the time, the reporting, filming and taking of photos was neither easy nor straightforward. Photographs by Robert Capa who was embedded with U.S. troops on Omaha Beach, took more than an week for his images to reach American news. File, The Associated Press
U.S. reinforcements wade through the surf from a landing craft in the days following D-Day and the Allied invasion of Nazi-occupied France at Normandy in June 1944 during World War II. From the first sketchy German radio broadcast to the distribution of images filmed in color, it has taken decades for the full story of the D-Day invasion to come out. As world leaders and veterans prepare to mark the 70th anniversary of the invasion this week, multiple Twitter hashtags are following the ceremonies minute by minute. At the time, the reporting, filming and taking of photos was neither easy nor straightforward. Photographs by Robert Capa who was embedded with U.S. troops on Omaha Beach, took more than an week for his images to reach American news. File, The Associated Press

Among D-Day stories are those of chaplains who helped keep hope alive for soldiers

June 06, 2014 5:11 PM

About Rabbi Brad Bloom

Rabbi Brad Bloom

@RabbiBloom

Rabbi Brad Bloom serves Congregation Beth Yam. He attended the University of Wisconsin and lives on Hilton Head Island.