In case you missed it in Lowcountry Life, March 16

rdamgen@islandpacket.comMarch 17, 2014 

STAFF ILLUSTRATION

  • WHAT WE'RE WORKING ON IN LOWCOUNTRY LIFE
    The features staff at The Island Packet and The Beaufort Gazette has several great stories coming up, and we need your help.


    • Do you have an unusual name or know someone who does? Email reporter Erin Shaw at eshaw@islandpacket.com.


    • Do you have trouble tearing your child or grandchild away from tablets, smartphones or video games? Do you have firm rules about their usage? If so, email family reporter Amy Bredeson at abredeson@islandpacket.com.


    • Are you afraid of bridges? We'd like to know more about how you deal with that fear while driving in Beaufort County or to Savannah or Charleston. Email reporter Laura Oberle at loberle@islandpacket.com.


    • Is there someone in your life who is losing his or her hearing but refuses to admit it? Or did it take you a while to accept your own hearing loss? Email reporter Laura Oberle at loberle@islandpacket.com.


    • Have you survived a life-threatening illness? If so, do you have advice or a story to share that might help or inspire others? Email reporter Laura Oberle at loberle@islandpacket.com.


    • Reporter Amy Bredeson is interested in talking with grandparents who are raising their grandchildren. Contact her at abredeson@islandpacket.com.

We get it: Life's busy. But Sunday mornings are great for catching up on reading. So settle in with a cup of coffee (or tea, or water, or whatever it is you're drinking) and see what you may have missed in Lowcountry Life this week.

The story some of you probably need right now. What a weekend, right? Did you celebrate St. Patrick's Day in Savannah? Or opt for the public tasting at the Hilton Head Wine and Food Festival? Either way, we imagine, you may not be feeling too hot. Why not try something different than chugging a Gatorade or popping some aspirin? Local chefs shared with us how they combat hangovers. Depending on who you ask, the cure is something cheesy or fatty or Southern or spicy. Our favorite advice? Either whip up a breakfast hash with leftover corned beef or go out to eat. "Never cook in that shape," Chef Sean Brock Husk and McCrady's in Charleston said.

Crack addicts. Do you pop your joints? Or maybe you're just the person who has to listen to that cringe-worthy noise when your spouse/friend/co-worker cracks their joints? Send them this. That notion that joint cracking can cause arthritis or damage? It's real, local chiropractors say. Doing it repeatedly (and wrong) can lead to joint destabilization, which could lead to further problems. Find out more in this week's Professional Opinion.

Pop quiz: Do you know how to boost your kids confidence? It's not as simple as telling him he's the best or the smartest. Compliment specific things, such as "I'm proud of you for studying so hard and glad to see it pay off." And -- this one can be tough -- let them figure out some chores on their own, such as making the bed or packing their lunch. As they get better at it, they'll be proud. For more tips from Lowcountry parents and a psychologist on raising confident kids, check out our story.

From commercials to Purim. What does serving a Ball Park frank to Michael Jordan or being the White Cloud in a popular '80s toilet paper commercial have to do with a Jewish holiday? Well, the guy that did those first two things, Gobby Cohen, has now written a speil -- a short, comedic play that tells the story of Purim -- for Congregation Beth Yam. Cohen, who got his start on The Second City, starred in hundreds of commercials and appeared several TV shows, retired to Hilton Head Island a few years ago. As he's settled into his new home with his family, he's begun to look for ways to use his acting experience. The first is the play, called "What's It All About, Esther?", which will tell the story of the deliverance of the Jewish people from the ancient Persian Empire.

Throwback....Sunday. You can let us get away with it. Expecting? Congrats! Have you heard about gender reveals? Parents have their ultrasound technician write down either "boy" or "girl," but not tell them. Then they plan a gathering where the gender will be revealed to them and their guests. Some common ways to do this are have a baker bake a pink or blue cake, or have a friend (one who won't spill the beans) fill a box with pink or blue balloons. It makes for a truly surprising moment you can share with friends and family. Read more about local couples who opted to take part in this fun fad.

The Island Packet is pleased to provide this opportunity to share information, experiences and observations about what's in the news. Some of the comments may be reprinted elsewhere in the site or in the newspaper. We encourage lively, open debate on the issues of the day, and ask that you refrain from profanity, hate speech, personal comments and remarks that are off point. Thank you for taking the time to offer your thoughts.

Commenting FAQs | Terms of Service