Sanford distorts record on labor union support

info@islandpacket.comApril 25, 2013 

Mark Sanford's depicting Elizabeth Colbert Busch as a tool of labor unions is an outright distortion. She has spent her entire professional career working as a manager. She is a member of the board of the Charleston Chamber of Commerce, and she understands that promoting business helps create jobs and creating good paying jobs helps business.

Earning a logistics transportation degree from Charleston College, she entered business as an intern at the Port of Charleston. Over 20 years, she rose to become director of sales and marketing for one of the world's largest container shipping lines. Because of her success in integrating private business with government facilities at the port, Clemson University grabbed her for the job of director of its wind turbine facility, as well as a position linking other university intellectual resources with the needs of South Carolina industries.

In contrast, Sanford spent a decade in finance and real estate, and in 1994 went to Congress; he never really left politics. After six years in Congress, he was governor for eight. Following his self-inflicted disgrace, he went into exile for two years. Now he runs for Congress.

Sanford and Republicans should read the GOP platform pland during the Eisenhower administration, which committed to: "The protection of workers to organize into unions and to bargain collectively is the firm and permanent policy of the (Republican Party)."

Then again, commitment is hard for Sanford.

Paul Russo

Bluffton

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