New street lights to save Port Royal money

emoody@beaufortgazette.comFebruary 24, 2012 

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Richard Thompson, left, watches as fellow ertel employee Billy Childers works on installing a street light at the intersection of 11th and Parris Avenue Tuesday afternoon in Port Royal.

SARAH WELLIVER — Sarah Welliver

  • Crews are excavating the parking lot at the former Steve Brown Catering store at 1190 Ribaut Road so gas pumps can be installed. The property is being turned into a Sunoco gas station, according to permits filed by PAA LLC with the city of Beaufort.

    Three pumps will be installed on the 22,333-square-foot property, which includes a building, according to the permits. The construction permit was issued in January. The owner could not be reached for further information.

    Steve Brown Catering occupied space that was once a convenience store, but it closed in 2009 when it merged with Smokey Chef Catering. Smokey Chef Catering continued on Lady's Island until about a year ago, when it was unable to renegotiate its lease at the Lighthouse Center on Sea Island Parkway.

  • Get breaking news, story updates and alerts about fun things to do in the city of Beaufort and surrounding areas by following Eye on Beaufort on Twitter.

The lights on Paris Avenue in Port Royal are a little darker this week, but only if you are looking from above.

On ground level, residents should see little change after the town switched to more energy-efficient LED fixtures that focus light downward instead of allowing it to escape upward.

About 25 streetlights illuminate Paris Avenue, and all are being replaced at a total cost of about $25,000, town manager Van Willis said.

The cone-shaped lights replaced the acorn-shaped fixtures this week. They are designed so less than 2 percent of light escapes upward, decreasing the energy needed and slightly increasing the amount of light on Paris Avenue, according to Willis.

The black fixtures reflect and focus the light so the rays are concentrated on the streets and sidewalks. The design reduces light pollution, Willis said.

It's not clear how much the lights will save the town on its energy bill.

The U.S. Department of Energy estimates LED lights can last 25 times longer than traditional bulbs and use 75 to 80 percent less energy.

Follow reporter Erin Moody at twitter.com/EyeonPortRoyal.

Related content

  1. Port Royal Town Council approves LED signs, Oct. 11, 2007
  2. Path-light plan gains ground, July 27, 2005
  3. Catering services join forces, March 23, 2009

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